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DEMENTIA

Cao Z, Xu C, Yang H, et al
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism|September 14, 2020

Through analyzing a cohort of 502,528 people derived from the UK Biobank, researchers explored the independent correlations of BMI and urate, as well as their interaction with the risk of developing dementia. This prospective cohort study involved individuals aged 37 to 73 years for whom BMI and urate were registered between 2006 and 2010. Using linkage to electronic health records, dementia was ascertained at follow-up. In total, 2,138 candidates developed dementia during a median of 8.1 years of follow-up. Compared with people of healthy weight, those who were underweight had an increased dementia risk. However, the risk of dementia tended to decline as weight rose, as those who were overweight and obese were 19% and 22% less likely than those of healthy weight to develop dementia. In addition, people in the highest quintile of urate were correlated with a 25% decline in the risk of developing dementia vs those who were in the lowest quintile. The authors discovered that BMI and urate were independent predictors of dementia, and there were inverse monotonic and dose-response correlations of BMI and urate with dementia.

Read the full article on Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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