Small-bore pigtail catheters for the treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax in young adolescents

Emergency Medicine Journal, 05/17/2012

Kuo HC et al. – The findings suggest that small–bore pigtail catheters may be as effective as large–bore catheters for the initial treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) in young adolescents.

Methods

  • Young adolescents (<18years) with initial PSP were treated with aspiration (control group), small-bore pigtail catheters or large-bore catheters.
  • Treatment was determined on a case-by-case basis with parental consultation.
  • Success rate, recurrence rate (within 12months), duration of hospital stay, duration of catheter insertion, and complications were analysed.

Results

  • There were 41 patients treated: aspiration, n=8; small-bore pigtail catheters, n=10; large-bore catheters, n=23.
  • Demographic and baseline clinical characteristics were similar between groups.
  • The success rates were 50.0% and 65.2% in the small-bore pigtail and large-bore catheter groups, respectively.
  • Corresponding recurrence rates were 20.0% and 56.5%.
  • There was no difference between the small-bore pigtail and large-bore catheter groups in the duration of hospital stay in patients for whom treatment was successful; however, the duration of catheter insertion was significantly shorter in the small-bore pigtail catheter group compared with the large-bore catheter group in patients for whom treatment was successful (p<0.05).
  • There were no major complications in either catheter treatment group and few minor complications (small-bore pigtail catheter, n=2; large-bore catheter, n=4).

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