The Influence of Different Movements on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Subacute Stroke Patients

The Journal of International Medical Research, 05/17/2012

Systolic blood pressure (BP) was found to be increased in hypertensive subacute stroke patients during their first and/or second attempts at performing active movements. Therapists should consider the BP of hypertensive subacute stroke patients during these first two attempts, especially for activities involving the patient moving from the ward to the rehabilitation centre.

Methods

  • The study included 35 subacute stroke patients (60 – 74 years old) and 15 age–matched healthy volunteers.
  • Ambulatory systolic and diastolic BP was measured over 4 consecutive days, before and during active movement.

Results

  • The greatest effect of the different active movements in stroke patients was on mean systolic BP variability (BPV).
  • There was a significant difference in systolic and diastolic BPV between stroke patients at different time–points and compared with healthy volunteers.
  • Systolic BPV during shifting from the ward to the rehabilitation centre was significantly higher than for all other active movements.
  • Mean systolic BPVs during the sessions on the first and second days were significantly higher than for the sessions on the third and fourth days in stroke patients and compared with healthy volunteers.

Print Article Summary