Use of a goal setting intervention to increase adherence to low back pain rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial

Clinical Rehabilitation, 02/24/2012

Coppack RJ et al. – The findings provide partial support for the use of goal setting to enhance adherence in clinical rehabilitation.

Methods

  • A mixed–model 2 (time) × 3 (group) randomized controlled trial.
  • A residential rehabilitation centre for military personnel.
  • UK military personnel volunteers (N=48); mean age was 32.9 (SD 7.9) with a diagnosis of non–specific low back pain.
  • Subjects were randomly assigned to either a goal setting experimental group (Exp, n=16), therapist–led exercise therapy group (C1, n=16) or non–therapist–led exercise therapy group (C2, n=16).
  • Treatment duration for all groups was three weeks.
  • Self–efficacy, treatment efficacy and treatment outcome were recorded before and after the treatment period.
  • Adherence was rated during regularly scheduled treatment sessions using the Sports Injury Rehabilitation Adherence Scale (SIRAS).
  • The Biering–Sørensen test was used as the primary measure of treatment outcome.

Results

  • ANCOVA results showed that adherence scores were significantly higher in the experimental group (13.70 ±1.58) compared with C2 (11.74 ± 1.35), (P<0.025).
  • There was no significant difference for adherence between the experimental group and C1 (P=0.13).
  • Self–efficacy was significantly higher in the experimental group compared to both C1 and C2 (P<0.05), whereas no significant difference was found for treatment efficacy.
  • Treatment outcome did not differ significantly between the experimental and two control groups.

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