Beta blocker use and colorectal cancer risk
Cancer,  Clinical Article

Jansen L et al. – The adjusted results do not support the hypothesis that beta blocker use is associated with decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). In contrast, the authors found a positive association of long–term beta blocker use and risk of stage IV CRC.

Methods
  • Between 2003 and 2007, information on beta blocker use and potential confounders was collected by personal interviews for 1762 CRC cases and 1708 control individuals from Germany.
  • The association of CRC risk and beta blocker use and subclasses of beta blockers was estimated by multiple logistic regression.
  • In addition, site- and stage-specific analyses were performed.

Results
  • After adjustment for covariates, no association was observed with beta blocker use (odds ratio [OR], 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86-1.29) or with duration of beta blocker use.
  • Also, the analysis by subclasses of beta blockers (cardioselectivity) and active ingredients (metoprolol, bisoprolol, carvedilol, and atenolol) or by CRC subsite showed no associations.
  • In stage-specific analyses, long-term beta blocker use (6+years) was associated with a significantly higher risk of stage IV CRC (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.25-3.27).

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