Comparison of hypertension management between cancer survivors and the general public

Hypertension Research, 04/27/2012

Cancer survivors appear to be better with antihypertensive medication adherence and blood pressure (BP) monitoring than those without cancer, and as a result, they appear to be under better BP control. However, several methodological limitations of the study prompt further research on this issue.

Methods

  • A nationwide, multicenter, cross–sectional survey was administered to adult cancer patients, currently receiving treatment or follow–up, who had been diagnosed with hypertension.
  • Comparison group was selected from among participants in the health behavior survey of the third Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
  • Self–reported hypertension management was surveyed, including antihypertensive medication adherence, frequency of blood pressure (BP) monitoring and perceived BP control.
  • Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between cancer survivorship and each outcome measure.

Results

  • Compared with the general population, cancer survivors were more likely to report full adherence (92.7% vs. 73.0%; adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=3.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.08–5.73), more frequent BP measurement (24 per year: 50.1% vs. 24.7%; aOR=2.51; 95% CI, 1.83–3.46), and very good perceived BP control (60.8% vs. 26.2%; aOR=4.34; 95% CI, 3.13–6.02).
  • Cancer survivors appear to be better with antihypertensive medication adherence and BP monitoring than those without cancer, and as a result, they appear to be under better BP control.

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