Comparison of the effect on long-term outcomes in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms of taking versus not taking a statin drug

The American Journal of Cardiology, 03/23/2012

The intake of stains was associated with an improvement in long–term outcomes in this cohort of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms. This was driven mainly by a reduction in aneurysm repairs.

Methods

  • A total of 649 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms were studied, of whom 147 were taking statins at their first presentation and 502 were not.
  • After a median follow–up period of 3.6 years, 30 patients (20%) taking statins had died, compared with 167 patients (33%) not taking statins (hazard ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 1, p = 0.049); 87 patients (59%) taking statins reached the composite end point of death, rupture, dissection, or repair compared with 378 patients (75%) not taking statins (hazard ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.57 to 0.91, p = 0.006).

Results

  • After adjustments for co–morbidities, the association between statin therapy and the composite end point was driven mainly by a reduction in aneurysm repairs (hazard ratio 0.57 95% confidence interval 0.4 to 0.83, p = 0.003).
  • On Kaplan–Meier analysis, the survival rate of patients taking statins was significantly better (p = 0.047).

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