Electrical Cardioversion for Atrial Fibrillation Improves Microvascular Flow Independent of Blood Pressure Changes
Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia,

Elbers PWG et al. – Successful electrical cardioversion (ECV) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) improves indices of sublingual microvascular perfusion. This change has no clear relation to the change in blood pressure and cannot be predicted from it. It may be prudent not to rely solely on global hemodynamic parameters to assess end–organ perfusion in this setting.

Methods
  • Adult patients who underwent successful elective ECV for AF.
  • Routine measurements of heart rate and noninvasive blood pressure were recorded and the sublingual microcirculation was visualized by sidestream darkfield imaging before and after the conversion of AF to sinus rhythm by elective ECV.

Results
  • The conversion to sinus rhythm significantly improved the microvascular flow index for smaller and larger microvessels.
  • For smaller microvessels, perfused vessel density did not reach significance after conversion to sinus rhythm, whereas the proportion of perfused vessels was significantly larger and indices of heterogeneity for microvascular flow index decreased significantly.
  • No correlation could be identified for the changes in mean blood pressure, perfused vessel density, and microvascular flow index for smaller microvessels.

Please login or register to follow this author.
Are you sure you want to Unfollow this Author?
► Click here to access PubMed, Publisher and related articles...
<< Previous Article | Next Article >>

    Currently, there are no available articles.

Your Unread Messages in Anesthesiology

See All >> Messages include industry-sponsored communications and special communications from MDLinx

Most Popular Anesthesiology Articles

Indexed Journals in Anesthesiology: Anaesthesia, Anesthesia & Analgesia, Current Anaesthesia and Critical Caremore

Register now to view all the MDLinx contents (FREE)!

  • Stay current on the latest literature, research and clinical news
  • Get special communications and offers from MDLinx and our sponsors
  • Receive invitations to paid market research
View Samples and Register

Connect with us, stay current.

Receive the latest mecial news
updates for free via email

Sign up!

Subscribe to our free RSS feeds:

Get the latest news in your specialty automatically added to your newsreader or your personal My Yahoo!, Google, My MSN or My AOL page. Learn More

Close